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Welcome to the website of the Enid Blyton Society. Formed in early 1995, the aim of the Society is to provide a focal point for collectors and enthusiasts of Enid Blyton through its magazine The Enid Blyton Society Journal, issued three times a year, its annual Enid Blyton Day, an event which attracts in excess of a hundred members, and its website. Most of the website is available to all, but Society Members have exclusive access to secret parts as well! Join the Society today and start receiving your copy of the Journal three times a year. Don't forget also that we have an Online Shop where you'll find back issues of the Journal as well as rare Enid Blyton biographies, guides and more.

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Posted by Sunskriti on February 15, 2017
Hey Barney! Darrell71 here. A quick question for you. I've read almost all of Pamela Cox's continuation books (Malory Towers and St.Clare's) and Anne Digby's continuations too (The Naughtiest Girl). I could, of course, find reviews online if I searched, but as this is pretty much the official Enid Blyton website, I was wondering what you guys/dogs think about those books. I mean, basically, as continuation books of some of the best Enid Blyton series, are there positive opinions overall or negative? Love and treats for you!
BarneyBarney says: A wuff of thanks for the treats, Sunskriti! Pamela Cox's continuation books have been generally well received, but opinions on Anne Digby's have been mixed. Pamela Cox had been a fan of Enid Blyton's school stories since childhood and she decided to write her first two St. Clare's books because she had always wondered about the "missing" years in the series. I think I'm right in saying that Anne Digby didn't know the Naughtiest Girl books well before being commissioned to continue the series and that she was approached by the publishers because her own Trebizon boarding school stories were so popular. If you search for "Pamela Cox" and "Anne Digby" in the forums, you'll be able to read the views of Blyton enthusiasts.
Posted by Aminmec on February 15, 2017
The illustrations in the Mammoth books match the Dragon books. I hope the text is also retained (as Mammoth are the ones I am taking pains collecting). The Noddy books seem exciting. Are you looking to sell them, Linda?
Posted by Linda Elliott on February 13, 2017
I have a full set of hardback Noddy books with dustcovers, purchased 1979/1980, new, good condition (not written or scribbled in). Made and printed in Great Britain by Purnell and Sons Ltd. Paulton (Somerset) and London. Copyright Enid Blyton as to the text herein and Sampson Low, Marston & Co. Ltd., as to the artwork herein 1963. Are they likely to be of any real value other than sentimental please?
BarneyBarney says: I'm afraid we can't give valuations but you could get an idea of what they're worth by looking up similar books on eBay and Abebooks and seeing what they sell for.
Posted by Aminmec on February 12, 2017
Hello Barney, for the first time I came across a vintage hardcover of The Mystery of the Invisible Thief. I saw the illustrations by artist Treyer Evans for the first time. The dark blue 90s Mammoth editions and also the Dragon paperbacks have different artists (two if I know correctly). How come the Treyer Evans drawings were not continued in the Dragon and Mammoth books? Also is there a possibility that the text is altered in them (especially the Mammoth books)?
BarneyBarney says: Publishers often change the illustrations when they think the old ones are beginning to look old-fashioned or they simply want to give the series a fresh look. I think the Dragon paperbacks have the original text if you're talking about the ones from the 1960s and 70s, though I can't be 100% sure. I don't know about the Mammoth editions but maybe someone else can help.
Posted by Aminmec on February 10, 2017
Thanks Barney. So I understand the 24 books with golly (hardcovers with jackets, without jackets and paperbacks) are unaltered. However, I don't know about the square books from the 80s illustrated by Edgar Hodges you speak of. Are they to be counted as authored by Blyton or are the 24 the final number?
BarneyBarney says: Yes, I think the 24 books have the unaltered text if they have a golly on the cover. I don't know whether anyone else reading this knows any different? Don't worry about the books with illustrations by Edgar Hodges. They're the same 24 titles but heavily abridged (or some of the 24 anyway, as I'm not sure whether all of them were released in that format).

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