The Enid Blyton Society

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Welcome to the website of the Enid Blyton Society. Formed in early 1995, the aim of the Society is to provide a focal point for collectors and enthusiasts of Enid Blyton through its magazine The Enid Blyton Society Journal, issued three times a year, its annual Enid Blyton Day, an event which attracts in excess of a hundred members, and its website. Most of the website is available to all, but Society Members have exclusive access to secret parts as well! Join the Society today and start receiving your copy of the Journal three times a year. Don't forget also that we have an Online Shop where you'll find back issues of the Journal as well as rare Enid Blyton biographies, guides and more.

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Posted by Paul on March 27, 2017
What food sounded the tastiest, Barney? For me it's Google Buns with the sherbet. Sadly, with my diabetes, I could not partake of a Google Bun.
BarneyBarney says: Sorry to hear that. We dogs are discouraged from eating buns (Google or otherwise) too, but my favourite Blytonian treats are juicy bones, sausages and potted meat. Oh, and I wouldn't mind joining Buster in nipping Goon's ankles!
Posted by Francesca on March 26, 2017
Hello! Like everyone on here, I love Enid Blyton and growing up was desperate to go to Malory Towers, or be in a club like the Secret Seven. The characters in her books had a very different life and outlook to that which is possible today. I'm writing a piece about what lessons we can take from Blyton's children to teach to our own, and would love your thoughts! I can, of course, credit you, or remain anonymous, or we can just chat about it for fun! Thank you in advance xx
BarneyBarney says: I'd say that Enid Blyton encouraged children to be like dogs - brave, clever, loyal, observant, friendly, forgiving, positive and full of boundless energy! I don't know whether you're a member of our forums, Francesca, but if you joined you could either start a thread on the topic or search for key words like "morals", "lessons" and "wisdom" to see what has already been discussed. If you wish to quote anyone you could contact them via private message.
Posted by Ron on March 24, 2017
I wondered if there is a particular tree which inspired the magic tree as I have been told it is a huge sweet chestnut in Forest Row.
BarneyBarney says: Do you mean the Magic Faraway Tree, Ron? I'm not sure that it was inspired by any particular tree. Enid Blyton loved trees in general and would have known myths and legends about trees such as Yggdrasil in Norse mythology, which connects nine worlds. She probably also knew the Elfin Oak in Kensington Gardens.
Posted by Julie on March 24, 2017
In reference to Tina's query & Barney's reply (March 19th) - The 13 colour plates are from Teachers' World & Schoolmistress definitely dated 1935-36. One example is - 'The Story of King Canute', dated 18/09/1935. Reference is made on this site, but we're trying to locate more information on the collection we have.
BarneyBarney says: Thank you for coming back on that, Julie. I barked out a message to my pedigree chum, Fido, about this and you're right that the plates were done for Teachers World in 1935-36, to accompany a 32-part history series written by Enid Blyton. Interesting stuff! You should have received an email from the Society.
Posted by Sherilee on March 21, 2017
Good afternoon. I hope someone can help me. I had many Enid Blyton books as a child, one in particular was a great favourite. It was one of her storybooks and contained a story about two sisters, one nice and one not so nice! The key points were that one sister chose an opulent cloak and the other a very modest cloak and also the same with brooches. One chose an expensive frog brooch, the other a dainty bird brooch. Can anyone tell me the name of the story and which book(s) it appears in please? Thank you very much.
BarneyBarney says: Ah yes - you're thinking of 'The Little Candy House'. The two sisters are called Rosemary and Rosalind. The story appeared in Enid Blyton's Fireside Tales (Collins, 1966) and several earlier books as you can see here.

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