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60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Courtenay » 04 Jul 2017, 10:37

Kate Mary wrote:I like the first story very much and I'm even warming to Noddy too.


Gosh, at this rate even Anita may yet be won over! :lol: :wink: Honestly, I thought "After the Party" was one of the most boring and annoying and obvious Noddy stories I've ever read — well, it is from relatively late in Enid's career. Her earlier Noddy stories, especially the first several of the original books, are much more inventive and full of fun, I've always reckoned. Noddy Goes to Toyland (the first Noddy book) is in some ways remarkably poignant for a story aimed at very young children — I remember reading it at the age of about 7 or 8 (a bit "old" for it, and of course I was very familiar with Noddy by then) and I was amazed at how moved I was by the question of whether Noddy would be accepted as a "real" toy and be allowed to stay in Toyland. It sounds funny, I know, but there it is. :wink: Much more thoughtful than this tedious business of Noddy driving off in the wrong car in the dark (duh) and not being recognised because he was wearing a different hat (double duh)!
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 04 Jul 2017, 11:20

Thanks, everyone, for your comments - always great to read your thoughts about the magazines. :-D

I'm afraid I really do have to agree about Noddy - maybe its partly because we've obviously read a fair bit of Noddy in the past, Courtenay - and so we can separate the better stories from the dross! I'm sure there have also been several Noddy stories with a similar theme, about Noddy getting in the wrong car or wearing the wrong hat or going to the wrong house, etc etc.

I agree about the Noddy stories from earlier on in Enid's career - they were much stronger. The first book in the Noddy Library is indeed one of the strongest - I love the details about 'Old Man Carver' and Noddy buying clothes and building a house (wanting to put the roof on first!) and then the more serious turn of events where Noddy has to go to court.

I do like some of the later Noddy books too though, such as Noddy and the Magic Rubber, Noddy and Tessie Bear, Do Look Out, Noddy, Noddy Has An Adventure and Noddy and the Bunkey. :-D

The first Big Noddy book also contains some wonderfully inventive Noddy stories - its my favourite of the Big Books because the quality is much higher than those that followed it in my opinion, and its illustrated by Beek. It contains a another story about Noddy being tricked by a golliwog, though - and its quite a sinister story too, with some great illustrations by Beek, and another (which was taken out of newer editions of The Big Noddy Book even as early as the 1960's) about a black doll who steals Noddy's clothes! Maybe it was this book that partly started the complaints about misbehaving golliwogs... 8)

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'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Courtenay » 04 Jul 2017, 13:09

Ah, now I've never seen the original Big Noddy Book — we do have the second one, which my dad was given as a present from his auntie and cousin when he was probably 6 years old, and passed it on to his own children years later. It's a long time since I read it, so can't comment on the quality of the stories, but looking at it in the Cave, the only one I remember clearly is Stop, Noddy, Stop! — in which Noddy borrows Big-Ears' bicycle and goes to buy him an ice-cream (I forget why — I think Big-Ears was injured or ill), but on the way back, finds there's a toy elephant chasing him... The story is not entirely dissimilar to After the Party, but somehow a bit more fresh and clever — Noddy thinks the elephant wants to eat the ice-cream, but as it turns out, it's all because he's ridden off on the elephant's bike instead of Big-Ears'! But the thing is that that's not apparent for most of the story, as the two bikes are very similar, so the outcome is a surprise when you read it for the first time. In After the Party, on the other hand, it was made very obvious from the start that Noddy and Tessie must have got into the wrong car, so it's a real bore as the story drags on and you're left wondering why neither of them stopped to think about it... :shock: :roll: :P

Rob Houghton wrote:It contains a another story about Noddy being tricked by a golliwog, though - and its quite a sinister story too, with some great illustrations by Beek, and another (which was taken out of newer editions of The Big Noddy Book even as early as the 1960's) about a black doll who steals Noddy's clothes! Maybe it was this book that partly started the complaints about misbehaving golliwogs... 8)


Could be. :twisted:
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 15 Jul 2017, 23:04

Another fortnight gone by, and time to open the next EB Magazine!

Its summer, and the magazine reflects this in its cover story - 'A Couple of Fatheads'

Image

Its a good story - typical 'lesson-to-be-learned' plot - but it works really well. The strength of the story is Enid's descriptions, and the way she really makes her readers feel the sense of isolation the boys must have felt out on the sea in their peddle-boat. A very entertaining story - but for me its the atmosphere Enid creates that is the real strength. You can see for yourself, by following the link. Thanks Tony! :-)

http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/magazine-details.php?magid=915

This 'Summer Holiday' issue of the magazine finds Enid on holiday herself, as she describes in her Editorial Letter. Although she's not writing her letter from Dorset, she tells us that this is where she will be - or rather, she doesn't tell us it was Dorset, but I'm presuming it was, as she mentions being by the sea and 'up on the windy hills'.

Enid tells us about the silk worms which children sent for earlier in the year, when they could send off for eggs through the post. Many of the silk worms will now have made silk cocoons which can be unravelled to collect the fine silken thread. She also tells us how the 'silk-worm man' has sent Enid Five guineas for the Famous Five Club Ward at the children's home in Beaconsfield.

As always, we learn about Enid's help with various charities - this time a charity which sends poor children 'away from town or slums' for a holiday by the sea or in the country. Enid writes - To send one child away for two weeks costs £4 - so, children, if your school has any money to spare in your 'school charities' fund, or from a school fete or Sale, please do ask your teacher if a little could be spared for a child who has never paddled, and never walked through a field. What a great idea! Of course, you can read Enid's full editorial letter by following the link.

After the cover story we have the very first chapter of the next Famous Five serial - Five Get Into A Fix - an unusual story to serialise in the summer, but I know that many people (Including Chrissie on this website!) enjoy reading books set in the winter when its hot outside. I must admit I probably wouldn't have enjoyed reading a snowy story in July - I like to read my winter stories in the winter! Though I don't mind reading summer stories when its cold and gloomy!

After the first chapter of this Famous Five story - and I bet the older children were heaving a sigh of relief after a few magazines that had very little on offer for anyone over the age of 7 - we come to the next short story - which again can be read by following the link. What A Thing To Do, Brer Rabbit - a typical Brer Rabbit story in which the rabbit tricks Brer Bear. Again - an amusing and enjoyable story...but I can't help thinking that Brer Rabbit stories are all the same after the first twenty or so! I do enjoy them though - particularly because of the wonderful illustrations by Grace Lodge.

Next, we have the centre-spread comic-strip story Rumble and Chuff. Another instalment of that thrilling tale, with the two main characters stopping to have tea with the little girl they rescued last time. This leads to Rumble and Chuff deciding they might 'hunt around for other children' in need of help.

Next we have yet another short story which Tony has kindly scanned into The Cave. Tony had a busy time this weekend, as none of the stories were ever collected anywhere else, so again, many thanks. What's Happened? is, unfortunately, not the greatest of stories. It might as well be a Noddy story...and has a very similar plot to the Noddy story that appeared in the last issue. Its starts off well, its well written, but its very predictable, and makes me wonder how old the lead character 'Bridget' is meant to be. She is certainly an air-head. Read the story and see for yourself! :lol:

Our Letter Page has some great letters as always. One from Carolyn Mitchell of Woodfield, Dursley, Glos - who writes - Dear ENid Blyton, Recently I had my plaits cut off and the other day I sent them away to an advertisement which was in the paper. When I had sent it away, I had to wait a few days, and then yesterday I received a five shilling postal order for my hair. I am enclosing this postal order for the spastics. Yours truly, Carolyn Mitchell

Just shows that there's no end to the lengths children went to in order to raise money for Enid's causes! :shock:

Another letter reads - Dear Miss Blyton, My mother went to Hereford recently and brought back a present for my brother and me, a Muscovy duck with seven little fluffy ducklings. They were hatched secretly somewhere out in the open where nobody knew. Guess what we called them? the Secret Seven! I think it is a very good name for them, do you? Love from Margaret Martin.


Next follows chapter 6 of The Birthday Kitten - more great Grace Lodge illustrations. She's one of my top EB illustrators, so I'm not complaining! She could always make a book look like a classic.

Following on from this is a picture puzzle - Find seven hidden ducks in this picture - and I couldn't help wondering whether Enid had been inspired by Margaret Martin's letter above! Quite a coincidence!

Following on is Our Puzzle Page - with the usual club puzzles -

SUNBEAMS Prize Puzzle -

Take the first letter of each of the birds shown below, rearrange them and make the name of another bird -

OSTRICH ROBIN PENGUIN
VULTURE LARK EAGLE



The FAMOUS FIVE puzzle -

What am I?
Half of me rhymes with tar,
The rest of me rhymes with hot,
You wash me, scrape me, slice me,
Then cook me in a pot.



BUSY BEES puzzle -

Can you change the word FOWL into someone who likes to eat a fowl?
If you change the letters round you will find him!


in Our News-sheet Enid plugs a few of her books, and the books of other authors -

THE NEW 'FIVE' BOOK - Many of you have written in saying "WHEN is 'Five Go to Billycock Hill' going to be in book form, Miss Blyton? We haven't seen it yet!" Well, you can see it now, if you go to your bookshop. I really think we have printed enough for all the FF Club members in the world!

THE SIX COUSINS BOOKS - These two books of mine "Six Cousins at Mistletoe Farm" and "Six Cousins Again" have again been reprinted. I think you will like them.

SEASIDE STORIES - Are you going to the seaside? Then read page 39 where you will see a nice book to take with you - SEASIDE STORIES - by Margaret Kent.


and so ends this fortnight's issue of the EB Magazine. Hope you enjoy the three uncollected stories. :-D
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Anita Bensoussane » 16 Jul 2017, 10:24

Thanks as always to Rob and Tony for bringing us these fortnightly write-ups/scans so we can enjoy diving into Enid Blyton's Magazine as readers did 60 years ago.

'A Couple of Fatheads!' is a very strong story - truly alarming and full of atmosphere as you say, Rob. Fancy Michael and Donald being called "a pair of little funks" by their own father! He's right not to allow his sons to go out in a pedal-boat if they can't swim, though I can't help wondering whether the boys might be more willing to persevere if their parents were more encouraging and less mocking! And surely their parents shouldn't go off to play golf (a hobby enjoyed by Enid and Kenneth!) and leave their children alone on the beach - especially when a storm is in the offing! General safety on the beach seems lacking too. Doesn't the man in charge of the pedal-boats keep track of how many have been hired out? A lifeboat ought to have been sent out when one of them didn't return! The illustrator inadvertently adds to the danger by showing a pedal-boat about to plough into a swimmer in the title picture! Of course, if safety measures were in place we wouldn't have such an enjoyably exciting and dramatic story!

'What A Thing To Do, Brer Rabbit!' is entertaining even though it's predictable. Somehow I can't help liking Brer Rabbit despite the fact that he's lazy, crafty and dishonest! I agree that Grace Lodge's wonderful illustrations add to the pleasure of reading the tale, Rob. She captures the world of Brer Rabbit beautifully.

Rob Houghton wrote:As always, we learn about Enid's help with various charities - this time a charity which sends poor children 'away from town or slums' for a holiday by the sea or in the country. Enid writes - To send one child away for two weeks costs £4 - so, children, if your school has any money to spare in your 'school charities' fund, or from a school fete or Sale, please do ask your teacher if a little could be spared for a child who has never paddled, and never walked through a field. What a great idea!

Yes, it's touching to read of the lady aged 78 who has contributed 5/- because she herself went on a holiday to the country when she was eight, funded by the same charity, and still remembers it with joy.

Rob Houghton wrote:What's Happened? is, unfortunately, not the greatest of stories. It might as well be a Noddy story...and has a very similar plot to the Noddy story that appeared in the last issue. Its starts off well, its well written, but its very predictable, and makes me wonder how old the lead character 'Bridget' is meant to be. She is certainly an air-head.

I feel the same way about that story. I can accept comic characters like Mister Meddle and Simple Simon making mistakes like that but it's hard to believe that a little girl like Bridget could be so remiss.

Regarding the letters page it's always great to hear of children raising money in ingenious ways, e.g. by selling their hair. I wonder if anyone does that these days?

Rob Houghton wrote:Another letter reads - Dear Miss Blyton, My mother went to Hereford recently and brought back a present for my brother and me, a Muscovy duck with seven little fluffy ducklings. They were hatched secretly somewhere out in the open where nobody knew. Guess what we called them? the Secret Seven! I think it is a very good name for them, do you? Love from Margaret Martin.

Very interesting. I hope Margaret Martin's family had a large pond!

Rob Houghton wrote:Following on from this is a picture puzzle - Find seven hidden ducks in this picture - and I couldn't help wondering whether Enid had been inspired by Margaret Martin's letter above!

It does seem likely. It's lovely to see the way Enid Blyton connected with her readers, using anecdotes from their letters in her stories and puzzles.
"Heyho for a starry night and a heathery bed!" - Jack, The Secret Island.

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- E. Nesbit, The Wonderful Garden.


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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 16 Jul 2017, 11:23

Thanks for your thoughts, Anita - brilliant to read them and to see what you thought, too! :-) You made some really interesting points.

I had to smile at the boys father calling them 'Little funks' in the 'cover story' - I'd never really heard the word before - and it sounds rather ridiculously insulting of their father - especially as both parents don't seem to care much about their boys and haven't really taken too much trouble in teaching them to swim. Then they abandon their boys on the beach, lol! No wonder the boys acted as they did - their parents weren't very good role models!

Its a great story though - one of my favourites - and the 'at sea' descriptions reminded me of the similar scenes in The Adventurous Four.

I know that selling hair used to be quite a thing - and an extra way for poor people to make money, too. I presume this still happens, as there are places that supply wigs for children who have cancer etc and have lost their hair. I've heard of children donating their hair to these charities that make real hair wigs - not sure if anyone gets paid for it though.
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby John Pickup » 16 Jul 2017, 19:36

I notice in Enid's postscript that she mentions the six little talks she recorded and sent out to Australia to be broadcast over the radio. I wonder if Courtenay's parents heard them.
A Couple Of Fatheads is indeed a strong story and rather frightening when Enid describes the storm at sea. I wasn't too impressed by What's Happened though, surely Bridget must have looked at the dog when she unfastened the lead from the railings. As Rob says, a bit of an airhead.
Thanks to Rob for the review and Tony for providing the links.
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Kate Mary » 16 Jul 2017, 21:53

A treat having three uncollected stories this issue. Thanks for the review Rob. The donation of five guineas from Mr Turner the silkworm man was a considerable sum in 1957 and the old lady who sent 5/- must gone on her country holiday in the 1880s. I love these little snippets of life from so long ago. Thank you Tony for letting us read them.
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 16 Jul 2017, 22:38

Thanks Kate Mary! yes - I thought how amazing that was, that the woman who sent five shillings must have been talking about the 1880's! How wonderful that she had remembered that all her life.

Thanks John - yes - I wondered if Courtenay's parents might have heard those Australian recordings too! 8)
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 29 Jul 2017, 19:03

Here's the latest Enid Blyton Magazine -

Image

Another interesting issue packed full of great stories. The cover shows an illustration from the first story, which is all about Mr Twiddle. Mrs Twiddle Is Cross - one of those typical Mr Twiddle stories where Twiddle gets things wrong. Its entertaining enough, and I enjoyed it - Enid sets up the story well, I thought, and although the main premise of the story is rather predictable, its also very satisfying - though I did feel for the poor old cat several times throughout the story! You can read it by following the link below, as Tony has kindly scanned it for The Cave.

Enid Blyton's Editorial Letter can also be read by following the link. This week Enid fills us in about the Busy Bees, and also tells us of how she is still on holiday in Dorset, sitting with the sea on three sides of her.

Our Letters Page has some great letters as always. One I found very interesting was all about amalgam, of all things! Rebecca Horwich writes -

Dear Enid Blyton
In a letter I received thanking me for the money and stamps I sent for the PDSA, you said that Amalgam was the most useful kind of honey, and you also said that only dentists had it. Well, I asked mummy if I could find out the addresses of some of the dentists near my home and ask them to save all their waste Amalgum for me, and she said I could. So now, and after having written out the same letter over and over again, they are all ready for posting. I hope the Amalgam (if I get any) will help to make some poor, sick animal well again. That's all for now.
Lots of love from Rebecca Horwich


Enid replies - I was very pleased, Rebecca, to read your excellent letter and to hear how determined you are to get Amalgam for our Busy Bees! What a lot of letters you wrote. I am sending you my letter-prize!

How intriguing! 8)

Next we have another uncollected story called Wake Up, Granpa! - what a great summery story this is - I thoroughly enjoyed it. Again, you can read it by following the link. :-D It has some lovely illustrations by Marjorie L Davies.

Puzzle Page

Here are some things you need when you go camping. The words are rather mixed up but if you re-arrange the letters you will find what the articles are -

NETT FINEK TLEAP LETTEK


Famous Five Puzzle -

There is a bird hidden in each of the sentences below - can you spot them?

a) We looked over the garden wall
b) Please, bring Anne to-morrow
c) The magician waved his wand


A Puzzle for my Busy Bees -

In which country was the famous writer Hans Christian Anderson born?


Rumble and Chuff continues this issue, in which our two heroes come across a 'big duck' in the middle of the path! Yes. That's as thrilling as it gets this week, apart from smelling the honey-suckle along the lane! ;-)

The new Famous Five story continues with chapter two of Five Get Into A Fix - Off To Magga glen. I'm really not sure I would have enjoyed this wintry story in the summer. I much prefer to read my stories during the right season - and I find it interesting that Enid chose to serialise it in July...although I guess it will still be running well into the winter, so maybe that was the reason! It's interesting to see the different illustrations used in the magazine version of this story. Even one that appears to be the same, of the car approaching the gates with 'Keep Out' written on them, is a little different!

The Birthday Kitten continues with chapter 7 - "It Looks Quite Happy Now!" - another example of those chapter titles which are set in speech marks. For me, the strength of this story is definitely the illustrations by Grace Lodge.

For those interested in the Amalgam letter, Enid explains further in Our News-Sheet she tells us -
I wanted to speak about something that is very valuable as a gift to the PDSA, for which all Busy Bees work - and that is some stuff called AMALGAM. You will say "What in the world is that?" Well it is something that can only be obtained from dentists, as it is the waste silver-filings and mercury that are left over when false teeth are made. (that is why false teeth are so expensive because these precious metals have to be used). Now every tiny quantity of left-over Amalgam brings in a useful sum of money, and when we are able to collect and send away a parcel of Amalgam and mercury, weighing 10lbs, we can actually get over £20 for it - a wonderful sum to help along the work of the Busy Bees for sick animals! It may be that your own dentist will be kind enough to give you his 'left-overs'. If you look on our letter page today you will see what one of our Busy Bees has done about this. Will some more of my Busy bees see what they can do, please?

That's this fortnight's magazine. Something for everyone as always! 8)

http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/magazine-details.php?magid=916
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby pete9012S » 30 Jul 2017, 08:56

Thanks Rob.I enjoyed the review.I don't know how Enid found the time to accomplish all she did.
Thank you to Tony for the scans too.
These articles and cave updates are probably (along with the caption competition ) among my favourite threads on the forum.
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Eddie Muir » 30 Jul 2017, 10:06

I agree entirely with Pete. This is a great thread. Many thanks to Rob and Tony. :D
'Go down to the side-shows by the river this afternoon. I'll meet you somewhere in disguise. Bet you won't know me!' wrote Fatty.

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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 30 Jul 2017, 11:33

Thanks to you both. :-D Your comments make it worth while, as its the only gauge I have as to how many people actually read this thread! As far as I know, not many do - but I enjoy writing it so far. When I don't enjoy it, that's the time to stop! 8)
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby John Pickup » 30 Jul 2017, 11:37

I enjoyed reading both stories. Another excellent review, Rob.
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Anita Bensoussane » 30 Jul 2017, 11:50

Thanks as always to Rob and Tony. I'm another one who thoroughly enjoys this thread as well as the Sunny Stories thread, letters from Teachers World, Cave updates, etc.

Great cover picture by Hilda McGavin of Mr. and Mrs. Twiddle. I'm very fond of the Twiddles.

Interesting information about the PDSA in Enid Blyton's editiorial letter. When I read about the PDSA in The Children at Green Meadows as a child, I thought it was just something Enid had made up for the story. I didn't realise it was a real charity and that Enid had encouraged her readers to become Busy Bees and raise money for it.

Interesting too about collecting waste amalgam from dentists. Children certainly thought of some ingenious ways of helping out!

'Wake Up, Granpa!' is a lovely, summery story as Rob said. Marjorie Davies' illustrations suit it perfectly. I particularly like the picture of the boats on the water, as viewed through the field-glasses.
"Heyho for a starry night and a heathery bed!" - Jack, The Secret Island.

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