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60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 09 Apr 2017, 10:12

sixret wrote:
In the Busy Bee puzzle, you have to find the animals hidden in the following sentences -

a) Don't slam both those doors!
b) Where is Bali on the map?



There is only one animal in each sentence, right?


i think so - Enid doesn't tell us - she simply says 'find the animals'! 8)
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Anita Bensoussane » 09 Apr 2017, 10:52

Thanks as always to Rob and Tony for the write-up and scans. I had to look up the word "chubunkin" in Enid's editorial letter. I found that it's normally spelt "shubunkin" these days and is a kind of goldfish with pearlescent scales and a pattern known as calico.

Rob Houghton wrote:The cover of this week's issue shows an illustration from the first story, The Two Swans. You can see a bigger illustration of this in The Cave. It's another good story - though given the 'violence' in it, I can see why it was never reprinted! Of course, I'm being tongue-in-cheek when I say 'violence' but there is certainly quite a lot of rough-stuff!

One interesting aspect is how Enid offers us a heroine who is every bit as tough as the bullies - a great equality story! Its teh story of two swans befriended by two children, and I must say the baddies are some of the most hateful children Enid ever created! I was angry at how nasty they are! Hope you enjoy the story. I found it quite interesting because we have swans on the canal behind our house, and a couple of years ago someone sadly shot one. It survived - and of course Enid's story doesn't involve a swan getting shot - but it reminded me of how realistic Enid could be when she wanted to be.

Enid was writing from the heart. In The Story of My Life she talks about two boys who stoned some swans which had built a nest on a pond in her garden. She says, "I think both those boys should have been well and truly whipped, don't you? There are just a few things that I think whipping should be the punishment for, and cruelty to animals or birds is one of them. I know you will agree with me in that."

I'm also reminded of her brother Hanly's account of how Enid reacted when he was given an airgun for his fourteenth birthday and tried shooting sparrows and starlings with it from the window of the downstairs lavatory. Barbara Stony writes in Enid Blyton - the Biography: "... a window directly overhead was flung open and Enid, her voice shaking with rage, yelled out, 'You wretched boy, I'll tear you limb from limb.' Hanly did not wait to hear more, for he knew that by then his sister was on her way down and she was a power to be reckoned with when roused. He was out through the window in an instant and ran round into the kitchen, in time to catch a glimpse of her breaking down the lavatory door with her bare fists."

The two stories 'Knots in his Handkerchief' and 'Where's that Duster!' are most amusing, though that duster must have been filthy after being used to dry the wet cat!

Rob Houghton wrote:...we have a Mr Pink-Whistle story - befitting of the time of year - Mr Pink-Whistle and the Easter Egg Should you want to read it, you can find it in Mr Pink-Whistle's Big Book -- a volume that is incredibly hard to find, especially in a dust jacket! I have a rather battered copy with no jacket - but it really is a nice book and well worth having if you're a Pink-Whistle fan. This story is all about a boy who steals an Easter Egg - and of course, gets his comeuppance when the egg hatches and a 'Tell-Tale Bird' comes out, which follows the boy everywhere telling everyone of all his bad and deceitful ways! A great fun Enid Blyton story - just the sort I enjoyed as a child.

I used to love stories like that too, where people were followed by birds or pokers or kettles, etc. which shouted out to everyone about their bad behaviour and/or spanked them. Sometimes Enid Blyton would end tales like that with a warning to be good - or the magic creature/object might come to YOU next! As a small child, I wondered whether something like that might really happen!

Rob Houghton wrote:Next we have the Painting Competition and I wish I was able to enter it, as the prize is THREE Enid Blyton books for each winner! Sadly I don't seem to fit into the age ranges though...unless I could be classed as 'a boy or girl over nine years old...? ;-)

Imagine how surprised the people at that address nowadays would be to receive an entry - especially from someone in his forties! :lol:

It's always interesting to hear about the youngsters in the Children's Home. I'm glad Winnie's mother came to fetch her.

Rob Houghton wrote:Enid also promotes the splendid Little Noddy theatre which is now available to buy, so that if you want to act out your Noddy stories, you can act them out on the stage of this toy theatre. It costs 18 shillings and has two sets of scenery, a real curtain, seven actors (Noddy and all his friends) and two booklets containing three plays.

Now - who wants to play Noddy? Bagsy me for Big Ears! 8)

I'll play a bad goblin who menaces Noddy! :wink:
"Heyho for a starry night and a heathery bed!" - Jack, The Secret Island.

"There is no bond like the bond of having read and liked the same books."
- E. Nesbit, The Wonderful Garden.


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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Tony Summerfield » 09 Apr 2017, 11:21

Rob Houghton wrote:Enid also promotes the splendid Little Noddy theatre which is now available to buy, so that if you want to act out your Noddy stories, you can act them out on the stage of this toy theatre. It costs 18 shillings and has two sets of scenery, a real curtain, seven actors (Noddy and all his friends) and two booklets containing three plays.


Image

I wonder what 'The Three P's' is all about - the mind boggles! :D
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 09 Apr 2017, 12:09

Thanks all!

Yes - I think it certainly seems that Enid was writing from the heart - and probably her feelings about animal cruelty are projected into the character of Linda. Thanks for including the quotes from 'The Story of My Life' and the Biography, Anita - I'd forgotten about those - I particularly love the image of Enid breaking down the toilet door with her bare hands! :shock:

'The Three P's ' sounds intriguing! Thanks Tony! :-D Given the story about Noddy 'spending a penny', the mind certainly does boggle! :lol:

Until I saw the scan of the play booklet, I had always wondered why three plays were in two booklets...why weren't they all in one booklet? Then I realised the wording is a bit ambiguous - presumably it was two booklets both containing three plays - so that two people could read the scripts at the same time! 8)
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Tony Summerfield » 09 Apr 2017, 12:25

It intrigued me, so I have just read the play and I am sorry to say that it features a rather unpleasant golliwog. I won't spoil it for others by saying why. I can say that the three P's are pepper, potatoes and petrol!

Yes, the two booklets are identical to make it a bit easier for the actors (just voice overs as the action is in the theatre itself). I'm afraid there isn't a part for you, Rob, as Big-Ears isn't in 'The Three P's'! :cry:
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 09 Apr 2017, 13:51

Tony Summerfield wrote:Yes, the two booklets are identical to make it a bit easier for the actors (just voice overs as the action is in the theatre itself). I'm afraid there isn't a part for you, Rob, as Big-Ears isn't in 'The Three P's'! :cry:


A Noddy story without Big Ears is like sausages without mash!! :cry:
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Anita Bensoussane » 09 Apr 2017, 14:35

You could always make up a part for Big-Ears! I can certainly think of a use for the petrol that probably isn't in the original play. :twisted:

Rob Houghton wrote:Thanks for including the quotes from 'The Story of My Life' and the Biography, Anita - I'd forgotten about those - I particularly love the image of Enid breaking down the toilet door with her bare hands! :shock:

So do I. She must have been 15 (coming up 16) at the time.
"Heyho for a starry night and a heathery bed!" - Jack, The Secret Island.

"There is no bond like the bond of having read and liked the same books."
- E. Nesbit, The Wonderful Garden.


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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 09 Apr 2017, 15:52

Anita Bensoussane wrote:You could always make up a part for Big-Ears! I can certainly think of a use for the petrol that probably isn't in the original play. :twisted:



You mean wood, petrol and matches?! :shock: :twisted:
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Daisy » 09 Apr 2017, 17:31

Now, now, Rob... you know how Anita loves the little fellow. :wink:
'Tis loving and giving that makes life worth living.

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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Courtenay » 09 Apr 2017, 19:02

Daisy wrote:Now, now, Rob... you know how Anita loves the little fellow. :wink:


Ardently, no doubt. :twisted: :wink:

I've had limited time online for a few days but am looking forward to reading the scanned sections of this issue as soon as I can — thanks as always, Rob and Tony.
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby John Pickup » 09 Apr 2017, 19:05

Thanks once again to Rob and Tony for the latest issue of the magazine. I enjoyed all of the stories and I love the drawing of the cat by Joyce Johnson in Where's That Duster. Linda in The Two Swans reminded me of Anne from the Famous Five turning into a tiger when she took on the two boys.
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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 09 Apr 2017, 21:56

John Pickup wrote: Linda in The Two Swans reminded me of Anne from the Famous Five turning into a tiger when she took on the two boys.


Linda reminded me of Anne, too! Pleased you have enjoyed the stories and the review, John! :-D
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Rob Houghton » 23 Apr 2017, 13:55

Image

http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/magazine-details.php?magid=909

It's that time of the month when we get our new Enid Blyton Magazine delivered! Its another great issue - in fact I think this issue is one of the best i've read so far - all the stories are enjoyable, and one is, I think, exceptional. :-D

We start with the Cover story, which is happily in The Cave for us all to read - thanks again to Tony, whose scanning work is very much appreciated and helps to make this thread come alive. Follow the link above to see the Editorial and THREE uncollected stories. :-D

The cover shows an illustration from A Very Peculiar Word - and its quite a peculiar story too - but one I found very entertaining! I had to smile a bit when I heard it involved the recipe for something called 'Tinkle Pudding'...obviously Enid didn't know the word had other meanings...! :-D I loved the story though, and thought it was quite clever. I liked the way she included a couple of 'puzzles' in the text - and in my copy the original owner has actually worked out the magic words etc in the margin of the story! :-D

In Enids Editorial Letter - also available to read in The Cave, we have the usual news about what ENid has been up to since we saw her last. I particularly liked her description of an April day - the glorious blue of the sky and the dazzling white clouds that loom up against it towering high...' because this was exactly the sort of April day I witnessed just yesterday, on a walk in Wootten Wawen with my dad - except the white clouds were few and far between. The sky was dazzling blue and it was very warm - a real spring day.

Its good to see Enid reminding her readers of the 'country code' of shutting gates, clearing up litter, stamping out fires etc - and she mentions the bluebells thrusting up their spikes...which seems a bit late! Yesterday we saw hundreds of bluebells, all fully out.

I was also interested to see that Enid advertises her new series, to start the following issue - 'The Birthday Kitten' - which I have in book form - and also she tells us I am now writing a new Famous Five story for you, you will be pleased to hear! It hasn't got a title yet - but I can see that the Five are getting into a fix of some kind!' :wink:

After the cover story, we have Puzzle Page with some entertaining puzzles -

Can you find the fruits hidden in the following sentences -

a) "Is that june or Angela?"
b) "Will the train stop each time?"
c) "It won't take me long to get there."


The Famous Five Puzzle asks us to rearrange the letters to spell three well-known British rivers -

HAMSET
BHUREM
VSNREE


Lastly, the Busy Bee competition question - which I admit, I couldn't answer - so I had to google it! -

Through which country does the St Lawrence River run?

Next we have a Brer Rabbit story - Brer Rabbit's Great Idea - as with all Brer Rabbit stories, its very enjoyable and amusing - but also very much like all the other Brer Rabbit stories. As a child I loved them and read my Dean Brer Rabbit trio of books avidly - but I'm less inspired by them these days. You can read this in Enid Blyton's Bedtime Annual 1971' - if you happen to have it. I felt that it was heavily based on some of the ideas in 'The Rat-a-Tat Mystery'! ;-)

Secret Seven Mystery follows with chapter 15 - and another illustration by Burgess Sharrocks which doesn't feature in the book version.

The feature In My Garden returns after a few weeks break, telling us its time to plant wallflower seeds, forget-me-knots and sweet Williams 'without delay'. Enid also suggests we ask someone to give us a Chrysanthemum root. She says pull apart each little cutting with a root and make a single plant' - which sounds Double-Dutch to me!

Rumble and Chuff continues - and is just about as exciting as the Noddy strip story was. I much prefer it in the book form, which goes into more detail. This week the carriage from the toy engine is thrown into the garden by an angry boy - and Chuff the pixie-man decides to climb in the window to take a look at the engine it belongs to.

Our Letter Page highlights letters from The Famous Five Club. One letter, from Susan Younger from Wylye in Wiltshire tells us how she is enclosing a cuddly dog for the Children's Home which I bought with some money I got by fining my Daddy whenever he eft his shaving brush or soap or anything else about' :lol:

Next we have Welcome To The Countryside - with some good tips and rules about how to behave on rambles and nature walks - such as always walking on the right when there's no footpath on a road - something people could do with being reminded of these days, as many don't observe this simple rule. She also encourages children to learn to read maps and to wear something white when they are out after dark.

Next we come to what I think is an exceptional Enid Blyton short story - Seven Ripe Plums. It is an Enid Blyton classic - effective, quite emotional in parts, and above all its totally 'real'. I also love the illustrations by Anne Read - which seem different to her usual style, using lots of vertical lines. I like them a lot. the story is all about Patrick, who steals some plums from his neighbour's tree. Its a fine story, and its a real pity it has never been reprinted.

The last uncollected story in this week's issue is a rather strange one called Something Funny Going On. I say its strange because its one of those stories that probably, as a child, you wouldn't question, but as an adult I had several 'what!?' moments! I mean - a tortoise was obviously going to feature, as there's one drawn on the title illustration - so that spoiled the suspense a little...and then I thought 'wouldn't the tortoise have woken up long agao?' and then I thought 'why would you put a tortoise to hibernate on a high up shelf?' - and then I thought 'wouldn't the tortoise have fallen off the shelf and damaged its shell? Maybe I'm just too analytical! :lol:

Lastly Our News-sheet and as always Enid fills us in on the stuff her various clubs are doing, plus any other news. I really do find her description of the children in her homes very telling - her love for children really shines through - and especially for the little black girl called Violet, whom Enid describes as our small dark Violet...was the picture of happiness and health, beaming at me with her great dark eyes. You simply can't help loving such a merry little thing... And once again I find myself saying 'This is a woman who is apparently racist'?!

Enid also tells us about some girls who, being members of the Busy Bees, stopped some boys throwing crabs against a wall to kill them, by threatening to phone for help. Then they rescued the crabs and put them safely into a rock-pool...although Enid also tells us they 'put the other smashed ones out of pain'. I was left wondering how? Did they stamp on them, or what?! :shock:

I also found it interesting to read what Enid has to say about 'Pony Books' - one of the few genres for children she never wrote. She explains - You would be surprised how many children as me if I will PLEASE write them a book about ponies or horses, because they love them so much. But as there are already some fine writers of horse books, there is no need for me to add to them! You will see two new pony books on page 43, so if you are a horse lover, do make a note of them because I think you will like them' The new pony books are A Red Rosette by Geoffrey Lapage and The Second Mount - by Christine Pullein-Thompson. Enid sounds quite generous, pressing horse-lovers to buy these books by other authors...but I'm not taken in by her excuse that there are so many horse books, why should she add to them! That never stopped her with school books, or magic, or adventures etc - so I'm guessing horses were not Enid's strong point. I seem to recall that she got most of her horse-knowledge from Imogen! ;-)

And so that's another issue done and dusted. Hope you enjoy reading the stories in the link. :-D
'Oh voice of Spring of Youth
hearts mad delight,
Sing on, sing on, and when the sun is gone
I'll warm me with your echoes
through the night.'

(E. Blyton, Sunday Times, 1951)



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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Anita Bensoussane » 23 Apr 2017, 18:36

Great stuff, Rob and Tony! I always enjoy Enid's editorial letter. I've seen wind-flowers, cowslips, primroses and bluebells on a number of occasions this year. I wonder when Enid saw flames sweeping over the spring countryside, causing everything to wither and die? Interesting to see her "thank yous" to children who have written to her - they include readers from B.W.A (is that British West Africa?), South Africa, Australia and Ceylon.

'The Very Peculiar Word' is an entertaining story, giving young readers something to work out and making them feel cleverer than the magician!

And yes, 'Seven Ripe Plums' is Enid Blyton at her best. Thoughtful and heartwarming with a clear message.

'Something Funny Going On' is nicely told but I feel too sorry for the tortoise to enjoy it.
"Heyho for a starry night and a heathery bed!" - Jack, The Secret Island.

"There is no bond like the bond of having read and liked the same books."
- E. Nesbit, The Wonderful Garden.


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Re: 60 Years Ago This Week - Enid Blyton's Magazine 1957 -

Postby Kate Mary » 24 Apr 2017, 07:25

A nice trio of stories. The first two are very good indeed, it's a pity they never appeared in a collection, I think I enjoyed Enid's editorial most of all. My thanks to Tony and Rob, it's much appreciated.
"I love everything that's old: old friends, old times, old manners, old books, old wine."

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